Leave a comment

June 2016 Dog Bytes

 

In This Issue


A Note from the Editor

Hello Everyone,

We hope you’re  enjoying the beginning of the busy summer months.

We attended the 2016 National Specialty in Monroe, WA and were happy to see lots of club members there enjoying the beautiful springers from around the country. If you’ve never been to a National,  you really should try to go sometime.

We’ll see everyone soon at our own specialty, which is July 22.

Dave and Janee’ Kemp, Editors

Here is the brochure for the upcoming National Specialty.

2017 National Specialty Flyer (2)

 


Future Meetings

Here is the remaining meeting schedule for 2016

Jul 22nd – Specialty at EXPO

Aug – no meeting

Sep 17th – Gilgamesh Brewery in Salem

Oct 15th – English’s – Halloween Party ?

Nov 12th – Nosework Presentation at My Dog’s Gym in Salem

Dec 3rd – Christmas Party at Englishes.   NOTE:  this is earlier than in the past.

Mark your calendars now so you don’t miss a meeting.

 

 


Brags

    • Vollie (Vanity Fair’s Voluntaire) won a five point major in Albuquerque and was BOS two times at Bahia Sur in California.  She now has 11 points and one major in limited showing.  At Puget Sound, she was third in her class in the sweeps  behind the Best in Sweeps.  At the National Specialtyl, she was second in Sweeps behind the Bose of Opposit in Sweeps.  She won the American Bred class at the National.  Her dam, Zenith (Vanity Fair’s High Crimes) achieved her Canine Good Citizenship Advanced at the National Specialty. Larry and Betty Schwartz
    • Donahan’s ‘n Cedar’s Zoot Suit, BN CGC- “Zoot”earned his first Novice leg at the Spokane Dog Training Club trial on May 21.  He earned his second Novice leg at the ESSFTA National specialty on June 3 with a third place in Novice B.  The “other Spaniel” Cavalier KC Spaniel, Trey earned his first Rally Advanced leg at Spokakne Dog Training Club trial May 21.  Don and Carol Callahan
    • Charlescroft Rip ‘N’ Shred was 2nd in a nice 9-12 month regular class line-up at the National Specialty. Also GCH Oxbow’s Gold Medal was 4th in his regular veteran class. Dave and Janee’ Kemp
    • Breeze (Majic Heart of Gold NAP NJP NFP CGC) owned by Mindy Perez and Michael Schlax, earned her Open Agility Jumper Preferred on May 27 with a perfect score, followed by a perfect score on her first Excellent Agility Jumper Preferred run. 
    • Robbie (Schoolyard Springer Robber Baron NW2 L2I CGC) owned by Mindy Perez, earned his Nosework 3-Vehicle title on May 21. For a NW3 Vehicle title, Robbie had to complete 3 legs of vehicle searches at 3 different trials. There can be 1-3 hides so this also involves knowing when he has found them all. 

There were more brags given at the recent meeting in Canby, but those have not been sent to us. It’s not too late. We can add them as soon as we get them.  Submit your brags to Dave and Janee’ Kemp: djkemp@oxbowess.com
Any brag donations should be sent or given to Mindy Perrez: min.perez@comcast.net
3207 NW Polk Ave
Corvallis, OR 97330


Show Results

Back to Top

Leave a comment

Award Report Form

Dog Award Report

Below is a link to the Dog Award Report form. If you wish to be considered for an end of the year award you must submit regular reports as outlined below.

Due at the end of each quarter.  Reports should be turned into Carol Callahan (donahan@gmail.com) no later than 15 days after the end of the quarter. If reports are not turned in quarterly, the results may not be tabulated.

First quarter is January 1st – March 31st; Second quarter is April 1st – June 30th; Third quarter is July 1st – September 30th; Fourth quarter is October 1st – December 31st.

To download the Microsoft Word document click on the link below:

DOG AWARD REPORT

To download PDF document click on link below:

DOG AWARD REPORT

 

 

 

 

Leave a comment

2015 Annual Awards

SPRINGER OF THE YEAR
Ch Vanity Fair’s Malfeasence, BN CD
Owners: Larry and Betty Schwartz

Runner Up
Cascadian N Fairhaven Sidekick
Owners: Carol Jansen and Jan Rafferty

BEST OF OPPOSITE SEX TO SPRINGER OF THE YEAR
Oxbow’s Sweetheart of the Rodeo
Owners: Dave & Janee’ Kemp

Runner-Up
Vanity Fair’s Buttercup
Owners: Larry & Betty Schwartz

AMATEUR-HANDLED SPRINGER OF THE YEAR
Cascadian N Fairhaven Sidekick
Owners: Carol Jansen & Jan Rafferty

Runner-up
GCH Oxbow’s Gold Medal
Owners: Dave & Janee’ Kemp

AGILITY SPRINGER OF THE YEAR
GCH CH Fairhaven Wildrose Out Of Grace
CD BN RE AX AXJ NAP NJP NF RATN CGCA
Owner: Carol Jansen

Runner-up
CH MACH Cascadian’s Touch The Sky
CD BN RAE MXS MJS MXP MJP XF T2B THD RATN CGC
Owner: Carol Jansen

BEGINNER NOVICE SPRINGER OF THE YEAR
Tri-Ste’s Let Me Be Crystal Clear NA NF CGCA BN RN NAJ NAP NJP NFP TDN Urban CGC
Owners: L Susan Smith & Tyler Smith

Runner-Up – None

RALLY SPRINGER OF THE YEAR
Tri-Ste’s Let Me Be Crystal Clear NA NF CGCA BN RN NAJ NAP NJP NFP TDN Urban CGC
Owners: L Susan Smith & Tyler Smith

Runner Up
Tri-ste’s the Divine Ms Em, BN RA THD CGCA Urban CGC
Owners: Judi James & Susan Smith

OBEDIENCE SPRINGER OF THE YEAR
No dogs eligible

2015 TITLES

Vanity Fair’s High Crimes, BN, CD, CGC – Owners: Larry & Betty Schwartz
Rally Novice

Vanity Fair’s Malfeasence, BN, CD, CGC CGCA, – Owners: Larry & Betty Schwartz
Therapy Dog Novice, American Championship

G & J’s Sequoia Spring – Owners: Gary and Jan Sturm
American Championship

Wedgwood N Tri-ste’s Spot On – Owner: L Susan Smith & Tyler Smith
Rat Instinct and Novice Rat

Ch Tri-ste’s And My Daddy Is, BN, PCD, RA, NA, NAJ, NJP, NFP, CGCA – Owner: L Susan Smith & Tyler Smith
Open Agility Preferred, Novice Fast, Therapy Dog, Urban CGC, Barn Hunt Instinct, Novice Barn Hunt

Tri-Ste’s Let me be Crystal Clear – NA NF CGCA – Owner: L Susan Smith & Tyler Smith
Beginner Novice, Rally Novice, Novice Agility Jumpers, Novice Agility Preferred, Novice
Jumpers Preferred, Novice Fast Preferred, Therapy Dog Novice, UrbanCGC

Tri-Ste’s The Divine Ms Em BN THDN CGCA– Owners: Judi James & L Susan Smith
Urban CGC, Rally Advanced, Therapy Dog

Ch MACH Cascadian’s Touch the Sky CD BN RAE MXS MJS MJP XF T2B THD – Owner Carol Jansen
Master Agility Excellent Preferred, Novice Barn Hunt

GCH Fairhaven Wildrose Out of Grace, CD BN RA OAJ OA NAP NJP NF CGCA
Rally Excellent, Agility Excellent, Excellent Agility Jumper, Novice Barn Hunt

Leave a comment

March 2016 Dog Bytes

In This Issue


A Note from the Editor

Hello Everyone,

We hope you’re all having a good time with your dogs and enjoying the idea of spring on the way. There was good attendance at the meeting in Albany at the Linn County show and some nice visiting after. We hope to see many of you at the awards banquet coming up this month.

Dave and Janee’ Kemp, Editors

Thank you to Carol Callahan for suggesting this article.

The Mystery of the “Bad Bite”

Elementary, My Dear Watson

by Diane Klumb

This article was published in the February 2010 issue of ShowSight Magazine.

Anyone who knows me at all probably also knows how totally excited I am by the ability of molecular genetics to solve the mysteries inherent in the breeding of purebred dogs. In addition to allowing us to actually “breed for improvement” instead of just blithely throwing the term around, I firmly believe that if used wisely, this new store of knowledge represents out best hope for both preserving the sport of dog breeding for future generations, and for fending off our own personal Professor Moriarty in the guise of Ingrid Newkirk & Co. But actually using  this new knowledge to our benefit, and to the benefit of dogs, often requires us to discard long-held and long-cherished beliefs.

Realizing that something we were taught years ago (and in many cases have passed on to the next generation of breeders) was based on an incorrect assumption, and may actually be flat-out WRONG, can be a difficult mental pill to swallow, and some people just can’t seem to do it.

For others, it provides an “Ah-HA!” moment, when the seemingly inexplicable suddenly becomes clear.

One such moment for me occurred a few years ago, when I learned that prenatal disruption (via genetics or environment) of a regulatory gene with the delightfully improbable name sonic hedgehog (SHH) often results in asymmetry, where the two sides of a dog don’t exactly match. (It’s a lot commoner than you’d expect, actually, and occurs in people to varying degrees as well. And symmetry in people has been linked to both beauty and longevity. Probably true in dogs as well.)

More to the point, an asymmetric dog will invariably crab, as he has longer reach and more drive on one side than the other, causing his forward progress to eerily resemble that of a ’63 Ford Fairlane with a bent frame. Yet stacked in profile the dog displays flawless balance, which has confounded judges and breeders since time immemorial.

When I shared that discovery in a column a few years back, an amazing number of judges who read it made a point of telling me that it was an “Ah-HA! moment” for them, too. (One told me that now whenever she sees a dog crabbing, she checks the elbows on both sides, and one is invariably set higher on the ribcage than the other.) An old dog show mystery solved by molecular genetics. Cool.

I had another of those “Ah-HA!” moments recently, when I stumbled upon a fascinating research paper while looking for something else entirely. (Happens to me all the time.)

It seems that scientists have discovered that the size and shape of the mammalian mandible (or lower jaw) is controlled by a surprisingly large number of genes – over 15 have been identified to date.

A little more digging revealed that an equally large number are involved in the development of the maxillary complex, or what we refer to as the upper jaw.

The kicker is……they are different genes, and inherited pretty much independently. Which means, in terms expressed as simply as humanly possible:  A DOG CAN INHERIT HIS UPPER JAW FROM ONE PARENT, AND HIS LOWER JAW FROM THE OTHER. Ah-HaH! Another dog-breeding mystery solved, and a long-cherished belief laid to rest.

Putting this into an everyday breeding scenario, here’s what too often happens. A young health-screened dog of quality with a magnificent head is widely used by breeders on bitches whos heads could use some improvement–depending on the breed standard, their muzzles could be a little shorter, or a little longer, or maybe a little more or less refined.

But rather than the overall improvement in the first generation breeders are hoping for, they get maybe one nice bite (if they’re lucky and depending upon what the bitch’s parents looked like) and a basketful of “bad” bites. (What constitutes a bad bite varies from breed to breed, of course.) Soon the word goes round that this lovely-headed dog “throws bad bites” and his stock drops faster than Lehman Brothers. Happens all the time.

And now we learn that it wasn’t his fault at all, poor guy. Breeders have been laboring for years under the misconception that an off-bite is the result of an AR gene, and that some dogs are carrying a recessive gene that causes them to “throw bad bites.” I’ve heard it said a thousand times over the years, and so have you.

But it is simply NOT TRUE. Turns out there is no single AR gene for an undershot bite, or an overshot bite, either. There are literally dozens of genes involved, all inherited more or less independently.

So, from this day forward (unless you are one of those people now recognized as incapable of changing a long-held opinion in the face of new evidence due to insufficient activity in the anterior singulate cortex and I’m wasting my time here) we can all stop blaming the poor stud dog.

What is actually happening genetically is this: Given Mendel’s Law of Independent Assortment, which is still scientifically valid after all these years, a percentage of the pups from an “unlike-to-unlike” breeding in the head department will inherit a larger percentage of the genes for a longer mandibular (under) jaw from one parent, and a larger percentage of the genes for a shorter upper maxillary (upper) jaw from the other, resulting in bites that are undesirable per a particular breed’s standard. NEITHER parent is to blame – malocclusions of the jaw, we now know, are polygenic.

Now, hopefully most of us already understand that there is a huge genetic difference between a MALOCCLUSION OF THE JAW and MISALIGNMENT OF INCISORS, which cause a reverse scissors bite in a dog whose jaws align according to the standard, and whose “puppy bite” is often perfect. Misalignment of incisors is usually caused by no more than the particular timing of the eruption of the individual permanent teeth – if it is off, the upper incisors will force the lower ones out, resulting in a reverse scissors. (That’s why it’s correctable with mere pressure.) There’s no sense blaming this one on either parent, either:

Research has shown there are more than FIFTY different genes that influence the development, and timing of eruption, of teeth.

Some of these genes, it turns out, are involved in other processes and also code for traits that we’ve actually selected FOR over the years—the MITF gene, for example, which is involved in pigment development (parti-colored dogs are parti-colored because they carry a mutation on this gene) is also involved in tooth development and timing of eruption, which is likely why the parti-colored pups in a litter often get their teeth later than their solid-colored brethren. The RSPO2 gene is also involved in tooth development, and a mutation on this one is responsible for canine head furnishings. (And that’s just two off the top of my head- no doubt there are dozens more, as we now know that genes “multi-task.)

The route to overall improvement in bites within a breed

     IS THE SAME ROUTE THAT HAS REDUCED HIP DYSPLASIA

          in several breeds over the last few decades.

This probably explains why wolves -uniformly long-muzzled, solid-colored, and generally free of head furnishings – rarely display the anomalies in dentition that plague purebred dogs.

Now, I’m NOT suggesting for a moment that we should be trying to put a ”wolf head” on all our dogs, or to make them all solid-colored or clean faced– to do so would seriously affect breed type in probably two-thirds of them, and not necessarily for the better.

What I AM suggesting is that simply understanding that malocclusion of the jaw and misalignment of incisors both appear to be polygenic, rather than the result of a single recessive gene, allows us to make more informed breeding decisions. Breeding a male with a gorgeous head to a bitch who is lacking and expecting the resulting puppies to all end up with his head (and bite) is about as silly as breeding a dog who is OFA Excellent to a dysplastic bitch and expecting the resulting pups to all end up OFA Excellent. No one with half a brain would blame the sire in that situation, because (hopefully!) we now all understand that canine hip dysplasia is polygenic, and represents a threshold characteristic.

The route to overall improvement in bites within a breed is the same route that has reduced hip dysplasia in several breeds over the last few decades. And as the German Shepherd breed has proven conclusively with its OFA ratings, you can do it without sacrificing breed type. Rather than discarding a quality health-screened male with a correct head per his standard who produces off-bites when bred to bitches with poor heads, it would make more sense to selectively linebreed off him, using only those offspring who inherited his head and petting out the rest. After three or four generations of this, the line should be homozygous for his head, the pedigree will have both depth and breadth in that regard, and malocclusions will be few and far between. What we’d be doing is simply combining time-honored animal husbandry practices with knowledge gained from cutting edge molecular genetics. It’s the future of responsible dog breeding.

However, refusal to change one’s long-held beliefs regarding mode of inheritance (i.e. continuing to believe that there is a single recessive gene for “bad bites” and that a dog who produces one is “a carrier”) as new information becomes available to us will untimately result in failure to improve. Why? Because the breeding techniques used to reduce or eliminate the incidence of a trait caused by an AR gene will always be different than those used to reduce or eliminate the incidence of a threshold trait caused by polygenics, where gene testing is not a viable possibility.

And consistently producing sounder, healthier dogs is more important now than ever because, make no mistake about it, the wolf is at our door.

See you at the shows, and remember to have fun out there!

-DK


Future Meetings

Here is the meeting schedule for 2016

Feb 27th – in Albany – Cascade Grill

Mar 19th – Awards Banquet at Sayler’s

Apr 9th – TBD

(Agility Trial in Eugene 22nd, 23rd, 24th)

May 21st – Keizer at the Iris Festival with Meet the Breed and Obedience demo

Jun 25th – Canby

Jul 22nd – Specialty at EXPO

Aug – no meeting

Sep 17th – TBD

Oct 15th – English’s – Halloween Party ?

Nov 12th – TBD

Dec 3rd – Christmas Party at Englishes.   NOTE:  this is earlier than in the past.

Mark your calendars now so you don’t miss a meeting.

If you would like to host one of the TBD dates or have a suggestion where to hold that month’s gathering, let Carol Jansen or Chris know.  Thanks!

 


Brags

  • Tucker just graduated from his 4-week puppy class a few weeks ago! He is now attending the Companion I class which is along the line of beginning obedience. He is going into his third week and has already accomplished sit, stay, come, and down. He is working on walking on a loose lead and is doing well. We are looking forward to the next 3-4 weeks and to see how much more he will learn.
    Bruce and Gayle Elgort.
  • Ana earned a Double Q in Albany and Be (new puppy out of Will and Ana) got a Sporting Group 2 in the Beginner Puppy class.
    Carol Jansen
  • Vanity Fair’s Buttercup (Petel), in the five Heart of the Desert Classic shows in Arizona, won Winners Bitch in three and Reserve Winners Bitch in the other two from the 9-12 Puppy Class.  She now has nine points and needs only majors.
    Larry and Betty Schwartz
  • Please submit your brags to Dave and Janee’ Kemp:  djkemp@oxbowess.com
  • Any brag donations should be sent or given to Mindy Perez.
  • min.perez@comcast.net
  • 3207 NW Polk Ave.
  • Corvallis, OR 97330


Show Results

Back to Top

Leave a comment

December 2015 Dog Bytes

In This Issue


A Note from the Editor

Hello Everyone,

The year, as always, has flown by and here we are at the holiday season.

We weren’t able to attend the Christmas party, but we heard it was a lot of fun for all.

We hope you each have a wonderful holiday season and new year.

Dave and Janee’ Kemp, Editors

We thought you might enjoy this article on technology which is being designed to help animals communicate.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/scientists-are-designing-technology-to-help-animals-%e2%80%98talk%e2%80%99/ar-BBnstuG?ocid=spartandhphttp://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/scientists-are-designing-technology-to-help-animals-%e2%80%98talk%e2%80%99/ar-BBnstuG?ocid=spartandhp


Future Meetings

Here is the meeting schedule for 2016

 

Jan 30th – at Debbie and Jeff Kirsch in Portland

Feb 27th – in Albany – Cascade Grill

Mar 19th – Awards Banquet at Sayler’s

Apr 9th – TBD

(Agility Trial in Eugene 22nd, 23rd, 24th)

May 21st – Keizer at the Iris Festival with Meet the Breed and Obedience demo

Jun 25th – Canby

Jul 22nd – Specialty at EXPO

Aug – no meeting

Sep 17th – TBD

Oct 15th – English’s – Halloween Party ?

Nov 12th – TBD

Dec 3rd – Christmas Party at Englishes.   NOTE:  this is earlier than in the past.

Mark your calendars now so you don’t miss a meeting.

If you would like to host one of the TBD dates or have a suggestion where to hold that month’s gathering, let Carol Jansen or Chris know.  Thanks!

 


Brags

  • Jackson, “Sir Jackson Stonewall,” went Group One at the Eugene Kennel Club Show over Labor Day weekend. This was his first show since March, his first show as a Veteran and his first Group One! Proud parents are Gary and Barbara Stonewall.
  •  Bruce and Gayle Elgort are adding a family member to their clan. Bella will have a baby brother from Carol Jansen’s brood and he will be named Tucker. (AKC name pending)
  • Carol Jansen reports that Cascadian N Fairhaven’s Sidekick, “Robin” was WD both days at Greater Clark County KC for two 3 point majors.
  • The Kemp’s would like to say we took “Baker” out as a veteran for the first time at the Greater Clark County shows. We’re learning the rules ( along with the judges). On Saturday he was 1st in veterans, then BOS, then BOH.
  • We think there is a brag coming in from the Schwartz’s, so we look forward to adding it here.
  • Please submit your brags to Dave and Janee’ Kemp:  djkemp@oxbowess.com
  • Any brag donations should be sent or given to Mindy Perez.
  • min.perez@comcast.net
  • 3207 NW Polk Ave.
  • Corvallis, OR 97330


Show Results

Back to Top

Enter your password to view comments.

Protected: August 2015 Dog Bytes

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

1 Comment

Willamette Valley English Springer Spaniel Association- Specialty Results 2015

Best in Sweeps-Silverhill Steel Wheels
Best of opposite in Sweeps- Ramblewood Counting Stars
Best in Veteran Sweeps- GCH Segre’s Brown Derby RA BN CD OA OAJ
Best of Opposite in Veteran Sweeps- CH MACH Cascadian’s Touch the Sky CD BN RAE MXS MJS MJP XP T2B THD CGCA

Winner’s Dog- Silverhill Steel Wheels
Reserve Winner’s Dog- Cascadian’s Fairhaven ‘s Sidekick
Winner’s Bitch- Beswin Ynot Now & Forever
Reserve winner’s Bitch-Alynn’s Moonlight Serenade JH TD

Best of Breed- CH Silverhill Serendipity Start Me UP
Best of Opposite- GCH Ramblewood Lady Marmalade
Select Dog- CH Ocoee Away We Go
Select Bitch- GCH Ramblewood Make a Memory
AOM-CH Silverhill Good Will Hunting THDN RN CGC

BOB Owner Handled- GCH Oxbow’s Gold Medal

Best Junior- Ramblewood N Keystone Raising a Rukus Tonight

Handler: Kawai Nahoopi

Obedience

183.0/1
DAN DEE’S RACE FOR THE CHASE BN CGC RN. SR
187.0/1
DAN DEE’S HIGH VELOCITY CDX R

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.